It is estimated that by 2050 two billion people would benefit from Assistive Technology, yet 90% will not have access.

AT2030 is changing that.

Photo of Ahmad Riyad Islami in Indonesia. Credits to Angus Stewart.

AT2030 tests ‘what works’ to improve access to life-changing Assistive Technology (AT) for all; investing £20m over 5 years to support solutions to scale. Led by Global Disability Innovation Hub and funded by UK aid, AT2030 will reach 9 million directly and 6 million more indirectly, driving a lifetime of potential. AT2030 is operational in 31 countries globally.

Programme Clusters

The programme is divided into four Programme Clusters to test ‘what works’ for AT

Latest

  • Powering Inclusion: AI and AT. The findings of an online expert roundtable

    Global Disability Innovation Hub, University College London, UNESCO's International Research Centre on Artificial Intelligence, European Disability Forum, Jožef Stefan Institute
    March 29, 2021
    Publications

    This briefing summarises the findings of an online expert roundtable on AI and AT held in November 2020. The event brought together experts working at the forefront of AI and AT to highlight the potential of using AI for AT.

  • New economics of assistive technology: A call for a missions approach

    Catherine Holloway, Vicki Austin, Sarah Albala, Rainer Kattel, Felipe Ramos Barajas
    Jan. 25, 2021
    Publications

    Part of the Data & Evidence Cluster this working paper answers one of the three main research questions: A Mission-Led Approach. This paper proposes a public sector-led, mission-oriented approach. While setting the mission and the directionality is the role of government, NGOs, industry, AT users and the charity sector are able to drive forward the agenda of AT access through their own essential and complementary roles.

  • Catalysing AT access: Scaling rehabilitative services and increasing access to AT in Kenya

    Clinton Health Access Initiative
    Jan. 13, 2021

    It is estimated that about 100,000 people need a wheelchair in Kenya annually. Across the 47 counties in Kenya, anecdotal evidence showed that health centres and access points for rehabilitative services are not evenly distributed, appropriately staffed, and sufficiently equipped. The situational analysis showed that Kenya’s access challenges are driven by a policy gap, limited service points with few trained personnel, fragmented delivery landscape, no national specifications, standards or supply chain and limited financing of rehabilitative services and wheelchairs.

  • Digital Fabrication of Lower Limb Prosthetic Sockets

    Dr Ben Oldfrey, Mark Miodownik, Dr Giulia Barbareschi, Dr Rhys Williams, Catherine Holloway, Global Disability Innovation Hub, UCL, Institute of Making
    Dec. 16, 2020

    This innovation insight discusses current approaches to digital fabrication of lower limb prosthetics (LLP) sockets aimed at low resourced settings. Digital fabrication of LLPs sockets has been researched for a number of decades, yet these technologies are not widely adopted, and most of the activities within this domain reside in high-income settings. However, the majority of amputees are in LMICs where there is a severe lack of access to services. It is in LMICs then, that the advantages that digital technologies offer could be of particular benefit however little to no progress in digital workflow adoption has been made to date

  • Innovation Podcast

    Global Disability Innovation Hub, University College London, Giulia Barbareschi, Government of Kenya, ALL Institute (Maynooth University), UK Aid, UCL, Rhys Williams, Dr Rhys Williams, Institute of Making
    Feb. 15, 2021
    News

    A podcast featuring interviews and stories from the brains behind the disruptive and cutting-edge innovations that are aiming to impact the lives of millions of people living in different areas of the world.

  • International Day of Persons with Disabilities in informal settlements in Sierra Leone and Indonesia

    Dr Ignacia Ossul Vermehren, UCL, Nina Asterina, Kota Kita, Hawanatu Bangura, SLURC
    Dec. 3, 2020

    The 3rd of December is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. We reflect on this year’s theme “Building Back Better: toward a disability-inclusive, accessible and sustainable post COVID-19 World” through DPU’s research “AT2030: Community led solutions” in informal settlements Sierra Leone and Indonesia.

  • Digital assistive technology for inclusion: Zainab's story

    Barbara Goedde
    Nov. 23, 2020

    Zainab Jalal Ahmed is 37 years old and works as a translator (Arabic-English) for the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Iraq. The documents she translates include Memorandums of Understanding and other legal document, as well as - to facilitate the sponsorship of Iraqi students to study in overseas universities in Britain, the United States or Australia - applications, transcripts of their marks and abstracts of their works. As many are documents are legal in nature, the translations need to be very precise. Zainab also interprets for delegations and other visitors.

  • Powering Inclusion: Artificial Intelligence and Assistive Technology

    Felipe Ramos Barajas
    Nov. 14, 2020

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that by 2050 two billion people will need AT, yet 90% will not have access. This is why the AT2030 programme is engaged in testing research, innovation, policy, and building community solutions to see what works in addressing that enormous challenge.

  • Exploring the experience of persons with disabilities of using mobile technology in their daily lives in Kenya and Bangladesh

    Nusrat Jahan
    Nov. 6, 2020

    Although, mobile phones are universally used for communication, for persons with disabilities they become essential assistive technologies that bridge barriers to opportunities which are not accessible otherwise.

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