Drive Affordability & Availability

Led by The Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), this sub-programme is developing AT Product Narratives to inform global investment and scoping market-shaping opportunities.

Products Narratives

Product Narratives are key elements of AT2030 objectives, helping to identify opportunities for AT2030 and others to test innovative models of what works to improve access to Assistive Technology (AT) with the potential to reach scale, through innovative products, new service delivery models and local capacity.

These reports will be also foundational in informing ATscale’s activities and investments in line with Objective II of ATscale’s Strategy Overview - to identify and invest in interventions required to shape markets and overcome supply and demand-side barriers for priority AT.

AT2030 look forward to engaging with partners interested in aligning their activities with the proposed strategic approach to enable the sector to collaboratively unlock potential to reach those most in need.

These reports are developed by the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) under the AT2030 programme in support of the ATscale Strategy.

Latest

  • Project Summary: Drive Affordability and Availability

    Clinton Health Access Initiative
    March 10, 2022
    Global

    Project Summary of Sub-Programme 6: Drive Affordability and Availability, under Cluster 3. The Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) partnered with country governments to identify opportunities to drive AT availability and affordability. This summary document highlights objectives of the project, impact, key achievements, lessons learned and outputs.

  • The President standing alongside other attendees for a photo opportunity Cover Image

    International Day of Persons with Disabilities

    Clinton Health Access Initiative
    Dec. 8, 2021
    Kenya

    President Uhuru Kenyatta was the Chief Guest in 3rd December's International Day of Persons with Disabilities held at the Kenyatta International Convention Centre in Nairobi. In the history of the commemorations, this is the first time a Head of State has graced the event.

  • Preventing lifelong impairment: Access to clubfoot treatment in low and middle-income countries Cover Image

    Preventing lifelong impairment: Access to clubfoot treatment in low- and middle-income countries

    Clinton Health Access Initiative
    July 19, 2021
    Global

    Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), commonly known as clubfoot is one of the most common congenital conditions, affecting 1 in 800 births. Left untreated, it can lead to life-long impairment, impacting participation in society, education, and employment. Most children with clubfoot can be successfully treated with the Ponseti method, a low-cost, cost-effective, and minimally invasive treatment protocol. Despite progress, less than 1 in 5 children born with clubfoot in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) currently receive treatment. This new cutting edge report, authored by CHAI under AT2030, explores solutions and recommendations for ensuring affordable and appropriate assistive technologies reach the children and adults with clubfoot that need it.

  • coverpage of the product narrative Cover Image

    Product Narrative: Digital Assistive Technology (executive summary)

    Margaret Savage, Tigmanshu Bhatnagar, Cynthia Liao, Mathilde Chaudron, Jeffrey Boyar, George Torrens, Katherine Perry, Priya Morjaria, Felipe Ramos Barajas, Barbara Goedde, Catherine Holloway
    Nov. 23, 2020
    Global

    This is the Executive Summary of the Product Narrative: Assistive Technology

  • coverpage product narrative Cover Image

    Product Narrative: Digital Assistive Technology

    Margaret Savage, Tigmanshu Bhatnagar, Cynthia Liao, Mathilde Chaudron, Jeffrey Boyar, Dennis Laurentius, George Torrens, Katherine Perry, Priya Morjaria, Felipe Ramos Barajas, Barbara Goedde, Catherine Holloway
    Nov. 23, 2020
    Global

    This document is the final in a series of in-depth analyses that identify key barriers and promising market interventions. The previous four documents focused on wheelchairs, hearings aids, prostheses, and eyeglasses.

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